The Lugg Meadows to Mordiford -stimulated by Brian Hatton

Brian Hatton’s painted landscapes mainly on the quieter western side of Hereford with the River Wye permeating his world, but he also used the River Lugg that he painted on the eastern side with the Lugg Meadows as his subject.

The Lugg Meadows are well known as ancient Lammas meadows; an area of common land that dates back to Medieval times. The Meadows are closed by the landowners for hay growth, between February 2nd (Candlemas) and August 1st (Lammas) each year, after which they are opened up to commoners for grazing.

I hope my photographs do justice to the Lugg Meadows, that stretch from the Lugg Bridge to Hampton Bishop, almost to the bridge at Mordiford and the confluence of the rivers Wye and Lugg.

More information on Brian Hatton is on my ‘Wyeside – stimulated by Brian Hatton’ page.

Mordiford was also the subject for various other artists, sometimes juxtaposing the church, bridge and river Lugg, but this is difficult to find a good aspect in the modern day. The confluence with the river Wye is still delightful, though sometimes curious cattle need to be circumvented!

The principal source to see paintings by Brian Hatton is Herefordshire County Council’s, Herefordshire Museum Service (see note below).

Much of Brian Hatton’s oeuvre can be found online at  http://brianhatton.herefordshire.gov.uk/ and herefordmuseums@herefordshire.gov.uk

and thanks are offered to Herefordshire County Council’s Museums and Collections Service to show the images of paintings they hold on this website – please contact herefordmuseums@herefordshire.gov.uk if you wish to use these images and where there is a superb resource of materials—articles, reproductions of paintings, educational materials and more. Herefordshire County Council curates the bulk of the more than 1,000 works by Hatton, supported by volunteers, and the original paintings can be viewed by arrangement.

There are three paintings by Hatton that encouraged me to take these pictures – Lugg Meadows (1906), Trees by water, Lugg Meadows (1911) and Trees, Lugg Meadows (1910):

001_218

Stock photography by Philip Chapman at Alamy